Ways To Make Event Attendees Hate You

Confused

We could go on and on about event planning best practices, we could share case studies and analyze past events or we could delve into what exactly makes a great event, well, great.

But as we gear up for an event in Seattle next week, our team started thinking not only about what we needed to get done, but also what we should absolutely avoid doing. Turns out the list of what not to do’s is a heckuva lot longer. Here are our favorites:

Hire staff, but don’t train them
There are few things worse for an attendee to hear “I don’t know” when asking an official-looking (logoed shirt, standing behind a registration table) staff member basic questions like, “where are the bathrooms?” and “is there parking nearby?”. Please, take the time to train outsourced staff on these little things.

Hire technically inept staff to run techie stuff
We save a lot of time and money by digitizing our check-in process, but to run our software requires a small amount of computing experience — like pointing and clicking. While this sounds like common knowledge, we’re always surprised when it isn’t. Take a few minutes to go over general computing usage so your staff feels comfortable.

Don’t coordinate with vendors and other stakeholders
When helping run conferences, we’re constantly field questions from vendors, sponsors, speakers and other non-attendees. While the answers may not always be on the tip of our tongue, knowing how to at least find the information others seek is integral, not optional.

Time to pack for our Seattle trip. Have a good weekend!